Security watch

Stanley’s Convergence Center of Excellence raises the bar for integrated solutions


For more details on the acquisition and insights into the future positioning of the company check out this link: www.security-infowatch.com/root+level/what-orsus-acquisition-means-nice.

Migrate to IP at Your Own Pace

Infinova’s Wilson at the SD&I press briefing.

Infinova’s Mark Wilson, who is vice president of Marketing for the Monmouth Junction, N.J., based company, visited SD&I’s HQ in Arlington Heights, Ill., as part of a media tour, making several announcements during the visit. He related plans to start a new advertising campaign under the catch phrase “Should Your Customers Make the Jump to IP?” as well as strategies to launch a new line of megapixel cameras at ISC West in March in Las Vegas.

The company continues to stress a cost-managed approach to the move to IP, and the desire to extend the life of existing equipment.

“Infinova is providing integrators the tools they need to help their customers migrate to IP at their own pace in a hybrid solution or completely to IP when ready,” Wilson said. “We can customize products for the systems integrator to provide the level of integration they need,” he said. He also revealed the company’s goal to launch a new line of megapixel IP cameras, a second-generation PTZ line. “Most PTZ cameras are standard definition or analog but this will be a high-resolution IP line,” he said.

Virtual NVR Generates Industry Buzz

IPVision Software’s Virtual Video Recorder™ (VVR™) is a concept that’s the future of the industry and it’s here now. The software is designed to virtualize the video recorder/server, according to Mark Kolar, executive vice president, Strategic Alliances & Corporate Strategy for IPVision Software, headquartered in Tampa, Fla.

The VVR introduction marks a significant milestone in the IP video surveillance industry by eliminating the need for costly, computer-intensive servers used as video recorders, he said.

“Unlike all Network Video Recorder (NVR)/Digital Video Recorder (DVR) products which are rooted on 50-year-old CCTV recording architecture that creates a server-intensive bottleneck, IPVision Software employs an open, but inherently different architecture. As a result, IPVision Software’s VVR™ video management solution virtualizes the video recording function reducing the need for servers used as DVRs and NVRs without compromising video or security operations at the protected premises and its customers.

Currently the company is focused on commercial and enterprise size organizations with distributed site challenges. “This type of solution can offer the building owner a total, complete security solution,” Kolar said. “For commercial and enterprise customers, the software can help end-users achieve operational savings of 25 to 66 percent,” he said.

The system virtualizes video over the IP network and the video surveillance software platform is suitable for hybrid or analog cameras. It provides distributed and hosted surveillance, without servers or video recorders by the end-user.

Eyes Turn to Legislature for Virginia Tax

The Virginia Electronic Security Association (VESA) is keeping a close eye on the state legislature, where it expects a tax on monitoring services to resurface again this year.

“It will be introduced again this year,” said Wayne Boggs, president of Richmond Alarm and secretary of VESA. “We have had an inquiry from the State Department of Taxation regarding the number of monitored systems in the state. We have hired the leading lobbying firm in Virginia to represent us, and have organized a grass roots effort among our members and others in the industry,” he said.

In 2009, two bills designed to turn monitored security and fire systems into a service to be taxed per account, per month, surfaced in the legislature Senate Bill 1006 created s a monitoring tax of $1.50 per month, per account, paid by the alarm dealer, whether you collect it or not from the end user. House Bill 1997 created a monitoring tax of $1.00 per month, per account, paid by the alarm dealer, whether you collect it or not from the end user.