Cisco discusses market strategy, new solutions at ASIS

Company says it plans to focus on large-scale deployments


At a press conference held Tuesday at the ASIS 2011 conference in Orlando, Cisco announced a host of new technology innovations designed to enhance urban safety and security.

Among the new solutions introduced by the company include; enhancements to its Video Surveillance Manager platform; the introduction of the Cisco IP Interoperability and Communications System (IPICS 4.5); and, the extension of the company’s Medianet architecture to third party camera makers.

According to Steve Collen, director of business development for Cisco’s Physical Security Business Unit, the company’s strategy is to focus on “large, complex deployments” and these solutions are a way for them to achieve this goal. Collen said that the company is also working to foster relationships with large systems integrators.

“That will be the evolution of our strategy,” he said.

IPICS 4.5 is a communication system developed for first responders that supports interoperability across a range of communication devices including cell phones, IP-based phones and radios. “That interoperability is absolutely essential,” Collen said.

According to Collen, the system uses the P25 radio network standard and allows dispatchers to send things such as video clips or text messages to emergency responders.

Cisco has also introduced a new Physical Security Storage Series platform that has the ability to manage recording of up to 120 terabytes of storage. Collen said that this gives the company 1,000 percent more storage capacity than it had previously and provides end-users that need to store video clips for extended periods of time with that capability. The Video Surveillance Manger platform also now supports third-party cameras with extended edge storage.

Also supporting third-party cameras, Cisco’s Medianet architecture allows an IP endpoint to interact with the network, allowing the automatic configuring of cameras and the quick diagnosis of trouble spots in the network. “We’re hoping it will take the industry by storm,” Collen told attendees at the press conference.

VideoIQ, which recently received investment funding from Cisco, will be the first camera maker to adopt the Medianet technology.

“We believe that Medianet is going to be a critical way that disparate solutions communicate,” VideoIQ President and CEO Ed Bednarcik said of the technology.

Collen said that Medianet allows Cisco to deliver a more quality surveillance solution to customers.

“The more people that have Medianet, the more of a quality system we’re going to end up delivering,” he explained.