New Jersey police department deploys JVC digital security system

River Vale law enforcement officials upgrade to IP surveillance


WAYNE, NJ (August 10, 2009) – Law enforcement officials for the Township of River Vale, N.J., now have a better view of prisoners who enter the police station. The River Vale Police Department recently installed digital video surveillance equipment from JVC Professional Products to enhance – and eventually replace – its antiquated analog system.

With a mix of interior and exterior cameras, the department maintains watch over any area at the station where police officers and visitors would be, including the entrances, dispatch, jail, and parking lot. Before installing the JVC equipment, the station was monitored for about nine years using a variety of analog cameras managed through a 16-channel digital video multiplexer/recorder (DVMR). The new cameras and recorders utilize IP (Internet protocol) digital signals that provide cleaner, higher resolution images and more flexibility of storage and analysis.

The new equipment includes a JVC VR-N900U network video recorder, two VN-V26U day/night security cameras, and a VN-X35U megapixel IP security camera. The VR-N900U features a built-in, four-channel encoder, enabling it to record images from four of the older analog cameras on the same high-tech platform as the new IP network cameras.

According to William Giordano, Lieutenant of Police, the JVC system has been in place for just over a month, but it is “light years above what we’ve had.” Specifically, he said the image quality is significantly better, with higher resolution and better frame rates. Plus, the new system offers more storage and its footage can be used as evidence in court.

With the success of the new surveillance system at the station, police officials are already considering additional applications. For example, in an effort to identify individuals who are engaging in criminal mischief, police could use a microwave link to connect covert wireless surveillance cameras in a specific area of town to the VR-N900U at the station. According to Giordano, a separate JVC camera and recording system could also be adopted to upgrade the station’s interrogation rooms.

Giordano appreciates the simple, VCR-style controls and intuitive operation of the VR-N900U. “It’s very important because not every cop is a technical guy,” he said. “The more user-friendly a video device is made, the more use the officers are going to get out of it.”

In addition, Giordano said the built-in motion detection and various search capabilities of the VR-N900U are major upgrades for the department. “That’s a home run,” he added. “It makes everything so much more efficient.”

Giordano recalled once case when a very expensive bicycle turned up missing from the town’s impound area. Eventually he discovered who removed the bicycle and when, but it took more than a day of scanning surveillance footage. “I had to spend hours and hours watching video in fast forward to see when the bike was there and when it disappeared,” he said. “With our JVC equipment, it would have been about 10 minutes worth of work.”