Sicel Technologies, Gentag enter strategic partnership

Companies to develop disposable RFID radiation sensor for shipping containers


WASHINGTON and MORRISVILLE, N.C. , April 21 /PRNewswire/ -- Sicel Technologies, Inc., a privately held, specialty medical device company, today announced that it has entered into a strategic partnership with Gentag, Inc., to create the world's first passive (no battery), disposable, wireless Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) sensor to detect radiation threats in shipping containers using modified cell phone technology.

The patented technology is a combination of Sicel Technologies' medical radiation sensor technology and Gentag's wireless sensor platform. The two technologies can be integrated with standard LF, HF or UHF RFID technologies or Radar Responsive Sensor Tags, thereby allowing these miniature radiation sensors to be read from distances ranging from one inch to about 12 miles. Sicel's established expertise in manufacturing FDA-cleared radiation sensors, combined with Gentag's platform technology, will allow the companies to quickly develop and produce a low-cost threat detection solution that can be rapidly deployed.

The technology can be used with cell phones that incorporate both an RFID reader and a sophisticated CZT isotopic radiation detector, as previously announced by Gentag and eV Products, thereby allowing immediate validation and GPS location of any potential threat. The chip can also be modified to include low-cost printable chemicals sensors.

"This technology has the potential to revolutionize threat detection in the global transportation and shipping industries worldwide," said Michael Riddle , President and CEO, Sicel Technologies, Inc. "We are gratified and excited that our innovative medical device has the unique versatility to not only help save people from a healthcare perspective, but now also by helping to make our shipping and transportation industries safer from potential threats."

Under the terms of the agreement, the companies will seek to license their combined intellectual property for developing container and shipping monitoring systems for the US Government, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and other countries, under a competitive bidding process.

"These new wireless threat sensors can be produced so affordably that they could feasibly be integrated into every shipping box used worldwide to immediately warn of potential radiological or chemical threats. The technology represents a new step for us towards the creation of ubiquitous mesh wireless sensor networks," said Dr. John Peeters President & CEO Gentag. "By overlaying the CZT technology, cell phones, and standard RFID technologies, any labeled box containing a potential radiological threat can be immediately authenticated and triaged. It is estimated that there are 200 million container trips per year and billions of packages are shipped every year that could be tagged with this new technology."

The technology is protected by 25 issued patents and a large number of pending international patents. Threat detection is a growing international concern. In the United States alone the 2009 budget for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will reach $50.5 billion.