RedShift Systems Releases New Optical Wavelength Converter for Thermal Imaging

Initial engineering samples shipped to establish leadership position in optical thermal imaging category


WALTHAM, MA - May 10, 2006 RedShift Systems, Inc. announced today that it has successfully completed the development and testing of engineering samples of its optical wavelength converter, the Thermal Light Valve (TLVT).

This marks a significant shift in the $2 billion thermal imaging market by facilitating the accessibility of high-quality, optical thermal imaging cameras to price sensitive markets including security, firefighting, first responder, automotive, industrial and all other markets where delivering universal deployment is critical. In the past, the high cost of thermal imaging cameras has made them inaccessible to 95% of potential users.

"RedShift Systems, Inc. has successfully fulfilled initial commitments with several companies and we have started shipping initial engineering samples of the TLV," said Matthias Wagner, CEO, RedShift Systems, Inc. "We will announce those companies during the course of the year. Our ongoing collaboration with OEMs sets a solid foundation for us to ramp manufacturing and address a market that is long-overdue for change, with our first module shipments in 2006," Wagner added.

"Every firefighter, every first responder, every law enforcement officer and every vehicle will have an optical thermal imaging camera on board thanks to this technology. By eliminating the cost barrier, we are making optical thermal imaging cameras available to everyone who needs to see at night, through smoke or through harsh weather conditions," Wagner added.

"Until recently, the only camera technology that worked satisfactorily at these thermal wavelengths (8-14 microns) carried a cost of between $5,000 and $10,000. Their use is limited to military or very sophisticated industrial applications that can afford the high cost unit," said David S. Terrett of J.P. Freeman Laboratories. "RedShift Systems has developed breakthrough technology, which allows for thermal imaging for mass production," Terrett added.

The patented core of the optical platform is RedShift's "Thermal Light Valve" which provides the competitive advantage. The "TLV" coverts long wave IR signals to CMOS visible light and measures infrared signals optically rather than electrically. This new platform is the first of a new generation of "Optical Thermal Imagers" that use an optical readout system based on standard CMOS imagers to measure infrared signals rather than the highly complex and specialized thermal-resistance effect employed in traditional microbolometers. Specifically, RedShift eliminates the need for non-standard materials like Vanadium Oxide (VOx) as well as the requirement for highly complex and custom readout integrated circuits (ROICs) that greatly reduce yield and raise costs of microbolometer systems.

RedShift's proprietary breakthrough allows a new generation of Optical Thermal Imagers to quickly replace the traditional uncooled thermal imagers.

Optical Thermal Imagers leverage the large commercial shipments, standard technology and off-the-shelf availability of CMOS imaging technology, thereby allowing exponential cost savings over traditional thermal imaging.

As a result, RedShift has broken down the cost and availability barriers and is now enabling universal deployment.

RedShift Systems enables the mass-market application of optical thermal imaging with consistent quality for security, firefighter, first responder, automotive, industrial and other markets where delivering universal deployment is critical. RedShift's core innovation, the Thermal Light Valve, can also be used in gas monitoring, motion sensing and infrared imaging.

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