Morse Watchmans helps control keys at Kentucky seminary

Key control system helps secure over 3,000 doors on campus for Southern Baptists


Oxford, CT (March 3, 2008) – If keeping track of your car keys or house keys can sometimes be a challenge, imagine what it must be like to have responsibility for the day to day management of hundreds of keys, all coming and going and being used by a multitude of individuals. But if you ask this question of Bob Perkins, Director of Safety and Security at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, he will be sure to tell you that it has not been a problem for his department since the school installed a Morse Watchmans computerized key control and storage system.

"Our campus has over 3,000 doors and when we changed over to a patented smart key system last year, it was imperative that we implement a key control system at the same time because a manual system was just not an option," said Mr. Perkins. "The Morse Watchmans KeyWatcher has provided us with a professional solution that has met our needs and more than lived up to its reputation for quality and ease of use."

The new key system was over a year in the design and planning stages and during this time, Perkins was also actively researching key control solutions. His study indicated that the best way was through the use of key boxes and the subsequent RFP was narrowed down to three vendors. According to Perkins, the references supplied by Morse Watchmans made his decision easy.

"I followed up with the schools and they all said the same thing – they couldn't be happier with the Morse Watchmans system," said Perkins. "What really tipped the scales in their favor however was when I contacted schools not on the Morse Watchmans' reference list and they told me exactly the same thing – the system is great and we couldn't be happier. After that, my decision was easy."

The school installed five Morse Watchmans KeyWatchers (3 @ 96 key capacity and 2 @ 48 key capacity) and Perkins is particularly pleased with the online monitoring, updating and reporting capabilities of the system. "At any time, I can view who has keys out or who has had keys out and when," he said. "We can add or delete names from the system through the network and it's a very simple process. In fact, almost on a daily basis changes are requested and we can implement them immediately."

According to Perkins, training was also a very easy process. Many of the housekeeping and grounds staff are non- (or limited) English speaking and the instructions for releasing a key from the KeyWatcher are no more complicated than entering an assigned code. Vendors who regularly visit the school, such as pest control services, can also be programmed into the system and given a code in order to have access to the necessary keys. For shift workers, up to two individuals can be programmed to one key and this helps to keep the system manageable.

When asked about future installations, upgrade paths and integration with access control systems, Perkins was quick to reply with a yes to all of the above. He adds, "We've already made two additional orders with Morse Watchmans since the original installation. And with regard to an upgrade path, the KeyWatcher is a future ready solution. When we're ready to add an access control system, all we have to do is program our smart key system and replace the metal keys with smart cards. The Morse Watchman KeyWatcher can be configured to hold smart cards and the software will provide the same access and activity reporting functions."

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