Drawing of Proposed ASASF Chamber Entrance

SAN FRANCISCO -- Design/build contractor Emmanuel Cabrera announced his plans for a new Airport Security and Screening Facility (ASASF), a more efficient and effective design for a security and screening chamber which can be installed and utilized without any major structural alterations to the existing structures of airports, federal buildings, hospitals, and commercial buildings around the country and the world.

"ASASF's design combines currently existing surveillance and screening equipment into one fully equipped, bomb-proof chamber," said Emmanuel A. Cabrera, the ASASF's designer. "The ASASF would provide the highest possible level of security while eliminating much of the inconvenience associated with today's conventional search and screening techniques."

The ASASF model greatly reduces the number of trained security personnel that would be necessary to carry out effective and efficient screening, and purports to eliminate body searches entirely. "ASASF is designed to be operated by a small number of trained agents, and doesn't require airport security personnel at all," said Cabrera. "And because the ASASF chamber could provide a comprehensive search and scan in seconds, the airport security screening process as it currently operates could be both improved and greatly accelerated."

A second phase of Mr. Cabrera's plan is another equipment design for use onboard aircraft, which Cabrera maintains could be very effective in combating air piracy and air terrorism even while the plane is in flight.

Emmanuel Cabrera presented his designs for the ASASF chamber to the Department of Homeland Defense and the President, along with his proposal for the construction of an ASASF prototype in January 2005, but has as yet received no response from anyone in Washington. "ASASF's prototype could be produced and tested almost immediately because all the technology incorporated in my design already exists," said Cabrera. "And in light of the current threat level that faces us all every day, it's unfortunate that we aren't making better use of the technology that is literally right at our fingertips."

Loading