Worldlabel.com Patents Process for Accurate Embedding of RFID Tags into Self-Adhesive Paper Labels

Worldlabel.com a manufacturer of laser and inkjet labels and barcode labels with presence in the USA and in Asia through Innotech Resources


NEW YORK, NY -- Worldlabel.com a manufacturer of laser and inkjet labels and barcode labels with presence in the USA and in Asia through Innotech Resources PTE LTD in Singapore has received worldwide PCT patent pending rights PCT/SG2004/000302 for a system and method for batch conversion for embedding RFID tags (Radio Frequency Identification) to RFID Labels. This method to convert RFID tags to RFID labels allows the tag to be embedded into a paper label with varying sizes on rolls according to customer requirements.

This system provides a low cost method of converting RFID tags to be embedded accurately into a paper label even though each batch might uses varying size labels and require the RFID tag to be embedded in different areas of the label. The methods allows for mass conversion efficiently. In this manner there is a big reduction in material waste and a reduction in labor costs is achieved as well when compared to the current manual procedure of "Meet, Match and Stick." Our invention is also user friendly and offers a much faster turn around for converting RFID labels especially when converting separate batches. As a result, the costs of RFID labels are significantly reduced thus making RFID labels a more favored option in manufacturing, logistics and other harsh environments where bar code labels might not perform.

"We are at the forefront of converting RFID labels. We have done several evaluations and tests and the results have been 100% positive," says Alex Choong, managing director and co-inventor. We are converting the RFID labels with the intention of meeting Wal-Mart RFID labeling requirements which uses a UHF frequency. Wal-Mart has requested that all their suppliers start using RFID labels by beginning of 2005. The request by the world's biggest retailer set off a scramble among companies including Hewlett-Packard Co., IBM Corp. and Sun Microsystems Inc. to develop workable RFID systems. The conditions Wal-Mart requires have been achieved by our new method of manufacturing RFID labels.

Typically, about 20% of the RFID labels in rolls have defective chips, but there's often no way to differentiate the functioning and nonfunctioning tags until after they've been placed on products. Our system and methods of manufacturing increases the reliability and consistency of RFID labels to 100% accuracy. This is important to the end users and manufacturers because it increases their throughput, it decreases the operational time that they need to print those labels, and the reliability of the label helps them integrate other high-speed applications. You can print bar codes on our labels embedded with UHF Class 1 and Class 0 RFID tags with most popular thermal label printers.

"We are producing a high quality RFID label with excellent accuracy and at lower cost levels. We are excited, having increased the functionality of labels and started a revolution. We have production capacity and are ready to take on the onslaught," Mr. Choong said.