OzVision Announces Partnership with HID

WOBURN, Mass., September 23, 2004 - OzVision, the standard for video verification and video services in central stations and HID, the premier manufacturer of contactless access control cards and readers for the security industry have formed a strategic partnership to bring integrated access control and video services to central stations. OzVision's video application will be integrated seamlessly with HID's VertX CS, open architecture platform.

With OzVision as a development partner, HID can now combine access control with video into the central station environment using the existing infrastructure. VertX eliminates the need for separate access control systems that today are merely co- located within the central station facility. The VertX CS panel is OzVision-compatible and can communicate bi-directionally with the OzVision receiver, the gateway into the central station. Access control exceptions of video clips are sent to PCs and handheld pocket PCs using the OzMail software.

VertX CS supports intrusion-related functions and terminology associated with central station alarm monitoring software, and is also a network-compatible access device that interfaces with HID Prox, iCLASS(r) and all other popular access control card and reader technologies.

With video becoming a critical part of security, both dispatchers and end users will now be able to monitor and view access control. VertX CS sends access information to the central station for logging, and exceptions directly to the central station operator's screen. By viewing video clips, dispatchers are no longer blind to critical events. The OzVision integration will also allow central stations to modify access parameters.

"The integration of access control and video to the central station over existing architectures is a major step for the security industry," says Avi Lupo, president of OzVision. "As the only video service fully integrated with all major central station software, OzVision is pleased to partner with HID to deliver this solution."

Today, if central stations do offer access control, it is being handled after hours. Central stations dial in, then upload information and download changes. While this works in most cases, the downside is that there is no communication handling the alarm side.

"This is certainly a milestone and a new market category for both access control and central stations. There is a growing market potential for access control to be handled remotely by central station automation software," says Mark Scaparro, HID's executive vice president of sales. "Many vertical enterprises don't want the hassle of learning, remembering and updating access hardware and software. They can now simply add a new person with access into their building at certain hours through the central station rather than having to do it themselves just like they do with their intrusion system. One system now offers many solutions to manage."

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