Virginia School System Adds Large-Scale Video Surveillance System

Spotsylvania County Schools installs Axis network cameras in half of its 30 facilities


CHELMSFORD, Mass. - Axis Communications, the global leader in the network video market, announced today that Spotsylvania County Schools in Fredericksburg, Va., has installed Axis network cameras in half of its 30 school facilities. Axis' partner, LenSec LLC, has already installed more than 300 network cameras, with a total of 500 cameras in all 30 schools scheduled to be in place and operational by August.

Spotsylvania chose a network-based security and surveillance system in order to proactively combat violence and vandalism on school grounds. The cameras are installed in public areas, such as entryways, hallways and parking lots. The district also uses cameras in cafeteria lines to prevent the loss of food and supplies. The Internet Protocol (IP)-based system enables authorized Spotsylvania employees to monitor schools district-wide via any Internet-connected computer and to easily share live or recorded video with local law enforcement officials.

"We wanted a security system that we could access and manage from anywhere across the entire district, not just from a single location," said Dr. Donald Alvey, director of secondary education for Spotsylvania County Schools. "Creating a network-based security and surveillance system was the best way for us to coordinate our efforts across all schools and with local law enforcement."

Spotsylvania chose a network video system because it provides better image quality than an analog system and allows for more flexible installation by eliminating the need for coaxial cabling. It also reduces installation costs by utilizing Power over Ethernet, which enables network cameras to be powered from an Ethernet switch instead of power cabling. The school district is also able to easily scale and upgrade the system as new buildings are added or more cameras are needed. In addition, network video systems do not require a dedicated monitoring system, deliver full-motion video (30 frames per second) via a computer network, and make use of standard IT equipment such as switches and servers.

"Network video systems are quickly becoming the surveillance technology of choice for many school districts around the country," said Fredrik Nilsson, general manager of Axis Communications. "As physical security and information technology continue to converge, schools are finding that the benefits and cost savings of a network-based system greatly outweigh those of analog."

Axis network cameras and video servers connect directly to IP-based networks and contain built-in Web servers and operating systems that enable the transmission of real-time images over the Internet. The K12M software, which LenSec designed for K-12 school environments, manages these live and archived images with a single solution, regardless of where the school is located.