Delta Scientific Bollards Tapped for Use at Hawaii Governor's Residences

VALENCIA, CALIF. - April 11, 2005 - Delta Scientific, the leading manufacturer of counter-terrorist vehicle control systems used in the United States and internationally, today announced that its high security bollards are protecting both the recently built Hawaii Governor's Residence and historic Washington Place, which housed Hawaii's governors for the past 80 years and is located on the same tropical grounds. Delta DSC800 decorative bollards are installed at the entrance to this celebrated site.

"Delta's decorative bollards are not only effective, but they beautifully complement their surroundings," explains Delta Scientific Senior Vice President David Dickinson. "Our bollards protect some of the most colorful cultural treasures in the United States, such as those at the National Archives in Washington, DC, and now the historic home of Hawaii's Queen Liliuokalani is among them."

Delta's bollards, which lower for passing, can be purchased with or without a decorative aluminum casting. For this installation, four decorative DSC800 bollards are installed on the road leading to the Governor's Residence. The castings can be powder-coated and are available in a variety of styles. Architects are free to design location-specific versions to match the architecture of a given facility, including emblems or logos.

The DSC800 can be a hydraulic, pneumatic, manual operation or fixed post bollard. Its height is 35 inches and its diameter is 12.75 to 13.25 inches. Applications include lower threat or low speed areas for Federal applications, residential, universities, walkways, cargo depots and rental car agencies. Speed of operation can adjust from 3 to 10 seconds.

Former Hawaii Governor Benjamin Cayetano spearheaded the project to construct a new Governor's Residence on the same grounds as the historic Washington Place. The 5,000-square-foot residence was completed in 2002 and was designed by an architect who specializes in historic architecture.

Washington Place is still used for official functions on the lanai (patio) and ground floor. The second floor is dedicated to public displays of the history of the home, which was built in the 1840s by ship captain John Dominis for his wife and son.

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