CRN Wireless' AP-D200 and AP-S200

NASHVILLE, June 27, 2012 – CRN Wireless, a leader in wireless communication for the security alarm industry, announced today the launch of two new cellular communicators by its AlarmPath division.

The new AP-D200 full data reporting and AP-S200 summary data reporting communication devices have integrated new proprietary technologies to create efficiencies that will result in lower unit prices and monthly subscription rates. “We are focusing our research and development efforts on functionality that will position CRN to continue its leadership role in wireless alarm communications,” said Richard Moreau, President of CRN. The devices will be priced competitively for sale direct to dealers and through distributors. Monthly subscription rates will also be competitive. Many dealers add CRN devices to existing alarm systems to modernize those older systems.

Wireless connectivity can eliminate the need for telephone lines or act as a back-up, or redundant communication path, providing an additional level of security for subscribers with telephone or VOIP lines. “Use of a wireless communication device is also a great way for dealers and central stations to increase RMR,” added Moreau.

The AP-D200 quickly connects to virtually any alarm panel with an easy 4-wire installation to capture and transmit the full data (all event and zone information) generated by the alarm panel. The information is then sent through the CRN Network Operations Center (NOC) to any pre-designated central station, security service, and/or the subscriber for appropriate action. Changing the destination points without reprogramming the panel is easily accomplished through CRN’s secure web portal to the NOC.

The AP-S200 connects to virtually any alarm panel with a simple 3-wire installation to capture and transmit summary data (alarm events) when the alarm panel is triggered. The AP-S200 is generally used as a back-up or redundant communication path. AlarmPath wireless communication devices function whether or not telephone lines exist or have been damaged or destroyed. Critical alarm information always gets through.

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