Security Watch

PSA-TEC and ESX coverage, municipal monitoring in Illinois, more


The Electronic Security Association (ESA) and the Central Station Alarm Association (CSAA) raced to the Charlotte Convention Center in early June for the ESX show and the results were positive all around.
Systems integrators, dealers, manufacturers and distributors gathered for days of educational topics, exhibits and lots of fun networking events-including a pub crawl that included bull riding and karaoke.

Leading industry accolades

One of the well-known events is the presentation of the Morris F. Weinstock Person of the Year Award, which went to Michael A. Miller of Moon Security Services and the Sara E. Jackson Memorial Award, presented to LJ Lynes of Stanley Security Solutions.

The Weinstock Person of the Year Award was initiated by the family of Morris F. Weinstock to honor the lifetime work of the ESA co-founder and past president. Miller was lauded for his tireless efforts to the organization and was equally surprised when his mother and two sisters came on stage during the announcement of the awards at the NASCAR Hall of Fame. Miller has been involved in the security industry since the late 1970s. He served ESA of Washington as president three times. In 2005, Miller was honored with the Sarah E. Jackson Memorial Award for his outstanding leadership as a committee chair. (The Weinstock award was sponsored by Interlogix).

"I think I can make a difference, I said to my wife, when I asked permission to take on the role of president," Miller told the audience. "I owe a lot to my wife and my family so I could go out and take on the important role of president. My mentor, George Gunning, said to remember all my stakeholders and that's what I did."

LJ Lynes, a national training instructor for Stanley Works, received the 2011 Sara E. Jackson Memorial Award for his dedication and leadership as chairman of the ESA Education Committee. He was commended for his efforts to raise the standard of education across the country. He serves as national liaison director for the Tennessee Electronic Security Association. (The Sara E. Jackson Memorial award was sponsored by Honeywell Security Group.)

ESA Launches Consumer Site

Have you seen it? Redesigned with the consumer in mind, www.alarm.org provides helpful safety tips for consumers as well as offers potential customers an easy way to search for companies in their area. Launched by the Electronic Security Association, you can find an ESA member by zip code. There's also a section on alarm system Frequently Asked Questions, a police and fire chief's corner, news and Facebook, Twitter and YouTube links.

Where the Heck is SD&I?

You can find Security Dealer & Integrator magazine on the award-winning Web site, www.securityinfowatch.com. From the home page, simply click on the magazine name/logo at the top of the page. You will also find blogs from the editors of SD&I on the home page or on the SD&I landing page. For SD&I's article archives, go to our landing page: http://www.securityinfowatch.com/magazine/sdi/. To see our digital online edition, use this url: http://sdi.epubxpress.com.

Communities in McHenry County Engaged in Municipal Monitoring
IESA's Call to Action gets community officials involved

By Natalia Kosk

The city of McHenry, Woodstock, Crystal Lake and Algonquin are now engaged in municipal monitoring within McHenry County, Ill. The recent development means business taken away from the private alarm monitoring companies-EMERgency24, Stand Guard and Alarm Detection Systems, to name a few-and increased monitoring costs for business owners within those areas. And many of those business owners are "quite irate" according to Kevin Lehan, executive director of the Illinois Electronic Security Association (IESA), Arlington Heights, Ill.

A majority of real estate owners understand the impact this has on their multi-tenant locations and "are pretty upset about this," Lehan referenced. Real estate owners with multi-tenant facilities are potentially faced with an annual increased amount of an estimated "$10,000 additional cost that they would be responsible for to cover the alarm monitoring mandated by the ordinance," Lehan explained.