NIST Research Generates Encryption Code for Ultra-Secure Video

Using fiber optics, NIST is able to generate raw code for 'unbreakable' encryption in record time


Raw code for “unbreakable” encryption, based on the principles of quantum physics, has been generated at record speed over optical fiber at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The work, reported today at the SPIE Defense & Security Symposium in Orlando, Fla., is a step toward using conventional high-speed networks such as broadband Internet and local-area networks to transmit ultra-secure video for applications such as surveillance.

The NIST quantum key distribution (QKD) system uses single photons, the smallest particles of light, in different orientations to produce a continuous binary code, or "key," for encrypting information. The rules of quantum mechanics ensure that anyone intercepting the key is detected, thus providing highly secure key exchange. The laboratory system produced this “raw” key at a rate of more than 4 million bits per second (4 million bps) over 1 kilometer (km) of optical fiber, twice the speed of NIST’s previous record, reported just last month.** The system also worked successfully, although more slowly, over 4 km of fiber.

For more information, see the full news release, as well as a web video and an animation at this address: www.nist.gov/public_affairs/releases/quantumfiber.htm.