Northland Security Introduces Personal Night Vision Surveillance Device

IR-illuminated M-II FlashCam can be used for evidence gathering, law enforcement, roving surveillance, belt-mounted device includes powerful LED light


Northland Security Products, Inc., a division of Otter Tail Corporation, has introduced a combination video camera and night vision system built into a single, 17-inch law enforcement and military-style LED flashlight. In addition to being a powerful 85,000-candlepower LED flashlight, the rugged, yet lightweight M-II FlashCam is ideal for covertly recording and documenting field conditions that law enforcement officers, military personnel and homeland defense personnel encounter every day.

Day or night, the M-II FlashCam can be used to document arrests, apprehensions, crime scene searches, investigations, interviews, inspections, vehicle and search warrant inventories, cell checks and domestic and family law cases. Its rugged aircraft aluminum case construction allows for years of trouble-free operation and comes with a custom belt ring that allows for easy holstering and carrying.

At a touch of a button, the M-II FlashCam will record normal daytime video (.asfs) and even take high-resolution still images (.jpegs) for precision evidence collection. Each unit includes a convenient vehicle-mounted 12-volt charger which also serves as a data transferring device to send all video, audio and .jpeg pictures from the M-II unit directly to an in-car video system or laptop for secure evidence handling.

On a single charge, the M-II FlashCam will provide up to 3.5 hours of flashlight operation and will record up to 1.5 hours of video and audio in either day or night vision mode. The night vision capability of the M-II is enhanced by 940-nanometer infrared LEDs, which are completely invisible to the human eye. This covert, nighttime operation is completely undetectable to a suspect, prisoner or person of interest.

According to Northland Security President Michael Howard, the device has already generated advance interest in the military and law enforcement markets, and he sees it as a tool that guard patrols and specialized surveillance units also would find of interest.