Debunking vulnerability assessment myths: Part 1

Experts discuss commonly held misconceptions within the industry


VAs should be done early and iteratively.  If you wait until the end, it can be very difficult, expensive, and psychologically/organizationally challenging to make necessary changes.   In our experience, having intermittent VAs (even from the very earliest design stages) while a security product or program is being developed is a useful and cost-effective way to improve security.

About the Authors: Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP, is leader of the Vulnerability Assessment Team at Argonne National Laboratory.  He was founder and head of the Vulnerability Assessment Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1992 to 2007.  Roger graduated from Carleton College (1977), and received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from the University of Colorado (1983).  He has authored over 170 technical papers and 90 invited talks (including six keynote addresses), holds 10 U.S. patents, and serves as editor of the Journal of Physical Security. 

Jon S. Warner, Ph.D., is a systems engineer with the Vulnerability Assessment Team at Argonne National Laboratory.  From 2002-2007 he served as a Technical Staff Member with the Vulnerability Assessment Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory.  His research interests include vulnerability assessments, microprocessor and wireless applications, nuclear safeguards, and developing novel security devices.  Warner received B.S. degrees in Physics and Business Management at Southern Oregon University (1994), and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from Portland State University (1998 & 2002).